Get To Know Anconcito Part 3 : FIMRC's Role

In the final installment of our photo series, we explore FIMRC's early efforts at Project Anconcito, Ecuador. We are currently focused heavily on integrating into the community and developing relationships with local institutions, leaders, and community members to truly understand the current health needs. Click on the images below to learn more.

An important part of FIMRC's site development process was a community-wide diagnostic, which we conducted with the help of Global Health Volunteers and local volunteers over the course of three months. 

An important part of FIMRC's site development process was a community-wide diagnostic, which we conducted with the help of Global Health Volunteers and local volunteers over the course of three months. 

Our community diagnostic was designed to learn as much as possible about current health conditions in Anconcito. We went door to door with the help of volunteers, asking the families questions about their living conditions, current and past illnesses, chronic conditions, education levels, income and other topics. We also measured weights and heights of all participants to get a general understanding of the nutritional status of Anconcito’s residents, especially children. 

Our community diagnostic was designed to learn as much as possible about current health conditions in Anconcito. We went door to door with the help of volunteers, asking the families questions about their living conditions, current and past illnesses, chronic conditions, education levels, income and other topics. We also measured weights and heights of all participants to get a general understanding of the nutritional status of Anconcito’s residents, especially children. 

With the help of over 60 international and local volunteers, we were able to interview almost 1,500 households in all 20 neighborhoods (“barrios”) of Anconcito. Our volunteers worked tirelessly, knocking on doors for hours on end in the hot sun, to reach as many families as possible. In addition to collecting valuable health and socio-economic data, the community diagnostic served as an opportunity for us to meet community members and explain our goals and objectives to the residents of our newest project site. We also built relationships with community leaders and engaged a powerful group of volunteers who are eager to be involved in future projects. Pictured here is Dennise, one of our most dedicated local volunteers. 

With the help of over 60 international and local volunteers, we were able to interview almost 1,500 households in all 20 neighborhoods (“barrios”) of Anconcito. Our volunteers worked tirelessly, knocking on doors for hours on end in the hot sun, to reach as many families as possible. In addition to collecting valuable health and socio-economic data, the community diagnostic served as an opportunity for us to meet community members and explain our goals and objectives to the residents of our newest project site. We also built relationships with community leaders and engaged a powerful group of volunteers who are eager to be involved in future projects. Pictured here is Dennise, one of our most dedicated local volunteers. 

Thanks to the work of our volunteers, we now have a wealth of quantitative data on health conditions in Anconcito, which we will use to inform our priorities and plan projects that will address the current needs. Above is a picture of Ariel, our youngest volunteer. He is 14 years old and volunteers in the afternoons when he gets out of school.

Thanks to the work of our volunteers, we now have a wealth of quantitative data on health conditions in Anconcito, which we will use to inform our priorities and plan projects that will address the current needs. Above is a picture of Ariel, our youngest volunteer. He is 14 years old and volunteers in the afternoons when he gets out of school.

In addition to our extensive community diagnostic, we began our health promotion work in Anconcito by holding afterschool clubs for boys and girls: “Superman” for the boys, and “Chicas Maravillas” (Wonder Woman) for the girls. We held these clubs for 8 weeks in three different neighborhoods of Anconcito, offering them to children between the ages of 7 and 11. 

In addition to our extensive community diagnostic, we began our health promotion work in Anconcito by holding afterschool clubs for boys and girls: “Superman” for the boys, and “Chicas Maravillas” (Wonder Woman) for the girls. We held these clubs for 8 weeks in three different neighborhoods of Anconcito, offering them to children between the ages of 7 and 11. 

Superman and Chicas Maravillas clubs are focused on various aspects of health promotion. The first four weeks of the course revolves around physical health such as nutrition, exercise, hygiene, and other types of healthy activities. The second four weeks focuses on mental health, with lessons related to healthy decision-making, goal setting, self-esteem, conflict resolution, gender equality and human rights, and other important life skills. 

Superman and Chicas Maravillas clubs are focused on various aspects of health promotion. The first four weeks of the course revolves around physical health such as nutrition, exercise, hygiene, and other types of healthy activities. The second four weeks focuses on mental health, with lessons related to healthy decision-making, goal setting, self-esteem, conflict resolution, gender equality and human rights, and other important life skills. 

While these clubs are focused heavily on health promotion, we also want to create a space for children to have fun, make new friends, and play games. We spend our time playing teambuilding games, doing activities to improve creativity and critical thinking, drawing pictures, and learning by interactive lessons. In this photo, the students were asked to draw a picture of themselves 10 years in the future. 

While these clubs are focused heavily on health promotion, we also want to create a space for children to have fun, make new friends, and play games. We spend our time playing teambuilding games, doing activities to improve creativity and critical thinking, drawing pictures, and learning by interactive lessons. In this photo, the students were asked to draw a picture of themselves 10 years in the future. 

This photo was taken during an activity in which we asked the students to write down their goals for the future. This child’s goal reads, “I want to run and win a race."

This photo was taken during an activity in which we asked the students to write down their goals for the future. This child’s goal reads, “I want to run and win a race."

At the end of the 8-week course we were able to graduate 40 students in a ceremony with certificates and Superman/Wonder Woman-themed cake. We plan to offer these clubs in more neighborhoods of Anconcito in the upcoming months to include even more children, and will also be modifying the curriculum for more age groups. While we are still in the early stages of program development, we are thrilled by the participation and enthusiasm we have seen from community members in all aspects of our work.

At the end of the 8-week course we were able to graduate 40 students in a ceremony with certificates and Superman/Wonder Woman-themed cake. We plan to offer these clubs in more neighborhoods of Anconcito in the upcoming months to include even more children, and will also be modifying the curriculum for more age groups. While we are still in the early stages of program development, we are thrilled by the participation and enthusiasm we have seen from community members in all aspects of our work.

A huge thank you to Stephen Huff Photography, our Field Operations Manager Rachel for her hard work (and blog contributions!), our volunteers both local and international, as well as to the beautiful community of Anconcito. We can’t wait to see what the future holds!

Posted on October 20, 2016 and filed under Ecuador, Project Anconcito.